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say you register a domain with your name (e.g., <your-full-name>.com)—what's the best username for an e-mail account at that domain, if you want it to be a general "here's how to get in touch with me" kind of thing? all of the options seem either repetitive or confusing to read out loud

@aparrish Always admired Marcy Sutton's "holla@" e-mail address, but was never daring enough to adopt it myself.

@aparrish when I had this I used contact@name.url but it just redirected to my gmail acct which is full.name@gmail so I decided to just use the gmail for everything after a while

@aparrish I've seen the first two equally, I think?

And things like having "business@<name>.<tld>" and "inquiry@<name>.<tld>" and "casual@<name>.<tld>" and stuff.

@aparrish (but also, depending on where you're putting it, anything from "hi@" [on a website contact section] to "inquiries@" [on a business card] tbh)

@aparrish I have a public one and a private one. People who receive both will know the difference and which to share, because the public one *says* public@

@aparrish I almost always use `contact@` for domains and post that as the public connection. The replies usually go to a specific user or name.

@aparrish i have two - [firstname]@ for humans to use, and mail@ for newsletters, registering on websites, etc

@aparrish I've seen a lot of me@, but isn't it more proper to use you@ when other people is typing it in? 😉

@aparrish I think I've most often seen [handle]@[handle].[tld]

voted for me@ but first-name@ seems closest to what I've seen

@aparrish For a long while, I was mister@lahosken.san-francisco.ca.us . It was OK.

@aparrish I have seen several hello@ and hi@. I’m actively considering the same question and don’t have an answer I love yet.

@aparrish [myname]@[familyname].[country] allows [sistersname]@[familyname].[country] etc.

But then my first name really doesn't narrow things down much.

@aparrish hello@ hey@ ahoy@ ? Now I kinda want to set up the ahoy alias...

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