just finished re-reading _Subcutanean_ (subcutanean.textories.com/), except this time I was reading two copies in parallel (i.e., read a section in copy A, then read that same section copy B, then move onto the next section in copy A, etc). reading it this way definitely brought out the "a million USB keys floating to a million surfaces" aspect of the text, though it also underlined how much the "spine" of the story is more or less static, despite all of the surface variations

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I also discovered that even though I've read four(!) different versions of Subcutanean at this point, the one that "seems right to me" is still the first one that I read. for whatever reason, the subsequent versions feel like variations on the first, even though that first one isn't especially remarkable in any way! weird

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more on Subcutanean (computer-generated novel) 

just had a fun discussion about _Subcutanean_ in my computational narrative class. we started high-minded and philosophical ("is this one story whose narrative discourse varies, or multiple distinct stories? how does *this particular* narrative benefit from generativity? is the obsession with underground spaces just a western trope, or a deeper cultural universal?") but ended up just telling each other about the weird variations we got in our copies

more on Subcutanean (spoilers) 

I know it doesn't exist, and it would completely go against the "point" of the story, but I still want to read the copy where Ryan ends up with the Niko who loves him and they escape the Downstairs together and they live happily ever after

@aparrish Why isn't Aaron on Mastodon? Seems like his kind of place.

@aparrish Incidentally, have you read Telephone, by Percival Everett? Similar thing going on, though on a smaller, less procedural scale. Three versions were published, with identical covers.

@aparrish Uhhhh…

I like everything Everett writes, so it's hard for me to give an objective opinion. Yes?

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