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death 

The anthropologist David Graeber just died. He is one of my primary intellectual influences, and his book DEBT changed my life back in 2011: bookshop.org/books/debt-update

Some articles of his that are also really important to me:

Using our mid-20th century projections of flying cars as a jumping-off point to think about what actually happened to material progress in the last 50 years: thebaffler.com/salvos/of-flyin

On bullshit make-work that contributes to the above: strike.coop/bullshit-jobs/

death 

@darius thank you for sharing, and my condolences. I remember reading Bullshit Jobs and enjoying it, it's definitely worthwhile for me to re-read it.

re: death 

@darius Well I need to read that book and the Baffler article. I remember the bullshit jobs piece very well.

death 

@darius oh my god this is heartbreaking... debt and bullshit jobs were super formative to me too... rest in peace

death 

@nasser
Does anyone know what the cause was?
@darius

death 

@darius So sad. There are precious few thinkers and writers of his caliber, willing to question and see past any dogma.

death 

@darius
> Where, in short, are the flying cars? Where are the force fields, tractor beams, teleportation pods, antigravity sleds, tricorders, immortality drugs, colonies on Mars, and all the other technological wonders any child growing up in the mid-to-late twentieth century assumed would exist by now? Even those inventions that seemed ready to emerge—like cloning or cryogenics—ended up betraying their lofty promises. What happened to them?

I'm sold. Thank you for sharing, and I'm sorry for your (our) loss.

death 

@darius oh no :( I read Debt too, it was excellent.

death 

@darius This is tragic. Debt left a big impression on me; it is one of the few books i've taken the time to go back and re-read.

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